Time-sliced #SuperBloodMoon lunar eclipse 2015

Time slices spanning 2.5 hours (left-to-right) of the latter part of the 'super blood moon' eclipse in September 2015.

Time slices spanning 2.5 hours (left-to-right) of the latter part of September’s ‘super blood moon’ eclipse. 156 shots, 60 s apart.

Following on from my cloudy solar eclipse time-slice in March this year, I thought I’d try a lunar one (clear skies!) using my fledgling ‘tslice’ Python module. Continue reading

Time-slice photography with Python (and the 2015 solar eclipse)

Time slices spanning three hours of very cloudy eclipse!

Time slices spanning three hours (left-to-right) of a very cloudy solar eclipse!

There was a solar eclipse in March, and all I saw was cloud.  I was prepared for this, of course, what with living in the UK these days.  But all was not lost!  I still got a photograph (indirectly) of the whole thing in the form of this time-slice, which shows a period of about three hours from left to right.  I wrote a Python script to do all the legwork for me, which I’ve put on GitHub should anyone want it. Continue reading

Fireworks in water

Fireworks in water 1

85 mm; f/11; 2.0 s; ISO 100

I had my camera with an 85mm lens on it at a fireworks display last weekend.  Not the easiest focal length for fireworks and I didn’t have a tripod either, so I tried something a bit different and got the fireworks reflected in the harbour.  Some of them look quite funky!

Continue reading

Aligning sun images using Python

Sun RAW frame collage

Fix it in post. It’s a common phrase in photography and one which is widely recognised as landing you in hot water if you’re not careful. Fix it in post-production, fix it after the fact. “Hm, I’ll just fix that in post.”

Well when I spent a day taking a few hundred photos of Venus crossing the sun last year with the intention of creating a time-lapse but without a tracking system, “fix it post” was my mantra by necessity. For 7 hours I followed the sun across the sky just by nudging my camera mount this way or that. As a result the sun was in a different place in every photo. The fact I wasn’t standing on the equator at the time meant it rotated too. Continue reading

Graphically verifying time-lapse intervals using ExifTool (and Excel)

Timestamp plot - annotated

Here’s a quick and easy way to check time-lapse intervals using a combination of ExifTool, (a great command-line application for reading and writing image EXIF data) and a program such as Excel to process and plot the data. Continue reading

Canon 5D Mark III astrophotography

The Bulge

“The Bulge”; Single exposure, ISO 5000, 24 mm, f/2.8, 20 sec

If anything shows off the low light capabilities of the 5D Mark III, it’s astrophotography. For me this doesn’t go any deeper than wide angle shots of the night sky, but luckily I got to try out the camera on some really dark nights at Siding Spring Observatory earlier this year. What strikes me about the 5DIII’s high ISO noise performance is how much colour and contrast detail you can retain. Bear in mind all these shots are at f/2.8.. if only I had a 1.4! Continue reading