Time-sliced #SuperBloodMoon lunar eclipse 2015

Time slices spanning 2.5 hours (left-to-right) of the latter part of the 'super blood moon' eclipse in September 2015.

Time slices spanning 2.5 hours (left-to-right) of the latter part of September’s ‘super blood moon’ eclipse. 156 shots, 60 s apart.

Following on from my cloudy solar eclipse time-slice in March this year, I thought I’d try a lunar one (clear skies!) using my fledgling ‘tslice’ Python module. Continue reading

Time-slice photography with Python (and the 2015 solar eclipse)

Time slices spanning three hours of very cloudy eclipse!

Time slices spanning three hours (left-to-right) of a very cloudy solar eclipse!

There was a solar eclipse in March, and all I saw was cloud.  I was prepared for this, of course, what with living in the UK these days.  But all was not lost!  I still got a photograph (indirectly) of the whole thing in the form of this time-slice, which shows a period of about three hours from left to right.  I wrote a Python script to do all the legwork for me, which I’ve put on GitHub should anyone want it. Continue reading

Fireworks in water

Fireworks in water 1

85 mm; f/11; 2.0 s; ISO 100

I had my camera with an 85mm lens on it at a fireworks display last weekend.  Not the easiest focal length for fireworks and I didn’t have a tripod either, so I tried something a bit different and got the fireworks reflected in the harbour.  Some of them look quite funky!

Continue reading

Astrocinemagraphy (not a real term)

AAT cinemagraphHere, I just had a stab at making a cinemagraph of the Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) using frames from colleague Ángel R. López-Sánchez‘ excellent time-lapse movie “A 2dF night at the Anglo-Australian Telescope”.  Ángel is an astrophysicist at the Australian Astronomical Observatory (AAO) and spends a lot of time using the AAT for his research.

As for the image, I made it with Adobe After Effects.

Aligning sun images using Python

Sun RAW frame collage

Fix it in post. It’s a common phrase in photography and one which is widely recognised as landing you in hot water if you’re not careful. Fix it in post-production, fix it after the fact. “Hm, I’ll just fix that in post.”

Well when I spent a day taking a few hundred photos of Venus crossing the sun last year with the intention of creating a time-lapse but without a tracking system, “fix it post” was my mantra by necessity. For 7 hours I followed the sun across the sky just by nudging my camera mount this way or that. As a result the sun was in a different place in every photo. The fact I wasn’t standing on the equator at the time meant it rotated too. Continue reading